Day Schools Selected
for Unique Training Program

Pedagogy of Partnership (PoP), a research-based professional development program and Jewish content provider, has selected four schools to participate in the inaugural cohort of the PoP Day School Fellowship, a multi-year fellowship that re-envisions learning.

The schools are

  • Luria Academy of Brooklyn, NY
  • Milton Gottesman Jewish Day School of the Nation’s Capital, Washington, DC
  • Oakland Hebrew Day School, Oakland, CA
  • Solomon Schechter Day School of Greater Boston, Boston, MA.

In PoP’s model, Jewish wisdom is not just what you learn or talk about but it is also how you learn and how you talk. PoP teaches a set of relational competencies – skills and attitudes – that provide fundamental building blocks for engaged Torah learning, robust conversation, and acquiring essential 21st century skills such as critical thinking, curiosity and wonder, creativity and communication. The multi-year fellowship will train a team of educators from each of the four schools in strategies and skills to design and support this approach in their classrooms. The fellowship will provide immersive institutes for cohorts, onsite and distance coaching, access to a suite of PoP teaching materials and capacity building to support the growth of this approach in the school over time. The fellowship is administered by Hadar in collaboration with the Pedagogy of Partnership.

PoP founders, Allison Cook and Dr. Orit Kent commented, “In today’s world, where many seek meaningful ways to engage with complexity and connect with others, PoP’s relational competencies are needed more than ever. PoP’s approach will provide teachers with a road map for teaching in an empowered way, in which students will learn skills and attitudes to make Torah learning their own and let it inform how they commuicate, build relationships and deal with complexity across disciplines, in and out of the classroom.”

For more information, contact Allison Cook at acook@pedagogyofpartnership.org.

The fellowship is generously funded by a joint grant from the AVI CHAI, Kohelet, and Mayberg Foundations.

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1 CommentLeave a comment

  • And how does this pedagogy incorporate the 18.6% of our Jewish children who have some form of a learning or developmental disability? I fear this is another example of Jewish educators ignoring a fifth of the student population who seek a Jewish education in the four schools you mentioned but are told “we can’t accomodate you.”
    Jewish educators need to focus on teaching their faculties differentiated and/or project based learning techniques that will accomodate all different types of learners so that all Jewish families who want a Jewish education for their child, receive one.

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